BioTrust Radio Episode #1: 7 Nutrition and Exercise Myths…BUSTED!

Written by Tim Skwiat and Shawn Wells

Welcome to the first episode of BioTrust Radio, our brand-new weekly podcast dedicated to answering your questions related to health, fitness, nutrition, and supplements so you can get better results, faster! In today’s show, Shawn and Tim help set the health and fitness record straight by busting 7 popular nutrition and exercise myths.

Tuning into the show is simple and convenient. To start streaming, or listening, right here on the blog, simply click the play button below. If you’d prefer to download the episode to your phone, tablet, or computer so you can listen any time, simply click on the iTunes or Stitcher link below. Enjoy!

To celebrate our first episode, we’re giving away $200 in FREE BioTrust supplements. So, after you listen to the show, be sure to leave a comment or question below to enter for your chance to win FREE BioTrust supplements!

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What Popular Fitness Myths Do You Believe?

When it comes to nutrition and fitness, it can be an incredibly confusing and downright frustrating world. There’s hype, fads, scams, and flat-out lies. As your trusted, go-to health resource, Shawn and Tim cover some of the most common and pervasive exercise and nutrition myths.

In this episode of BioTrust Radio, Shawn and Tim answer questions like:

  • What’s the best type of cardio for weight loss?
  • How can you use exercise to boost your metabolism?
  • Is sodium bad for you?
  • Does dietary cholesterol increase blood cholesterol?
  • Does saturated fat increase blood cholesterol?
  • What is the “bliss point” and how do processed foods drive overeating?
  • What are the real “bad guys” when it comes to nutrition?
  • Is margarine really healthier than butter?
  • Is canola oil healthy?
  • Is coconut oil dangerous? Assets

We’ll cover these burning questions and much more. Enjoy!

Enjoy the show? Please leave a 5-star review on iTunes or Stitcher.
Don’t miss an episode of BioTrust Radio! Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher.
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Have a comment or question on this episode? Comment below.

And remember…you’re just one decision away from better health and a better body

Additional Resources—BioTrust Blog Articles:

Show Notes—Transcript

Shawn: On this episode, Tim and I are going to get into something good. We’re going to talk about myths and myth‑busting. We’re going to get into things like high-intensity interval training versus low-intensity, slow-go cardio. We’re going to talk about things like sodium, fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, eggs.

All these things, like high-protein diets, “Are they dangerous?” And we’re going to talk about all these things that we keep hearing about in the news. Basically, since the 70s, a lot of these beliefs have existed, but are they true? Is that what the science really says? And sometimes even respected bodies of researchers and professionals are putting out this information, even now, creating more confusion to you, the listeners, and the BioTrust community. We’re going to get into some really good myth-busting, so if you’re ready, here we go.

Tim: Sounds great, Shawn. Let’s start with an exercise one. How does that sound?

Shawn: Okay.

Tim: We typically hear from people about cardio. Most of the people that we’re talking to, from a coaching standpoint, are interested in weight loss and overall health, so they know that exercise is an important component of that formula. They think that they need to do hours and hours of cardio in order to lose weight and support heart health. So, let’s dig into that. Is that the best recipe for fat loss and health, or there are other options?

Shawn: There’s definitely other options. So, that typical cardio, what I would call cardio, is low‑intensity, steady-state exercise. Now what that means is maybe you’re working out at 40-50% exertion and you’re keeping the same pace the whole time. Think of jogging, being on a treadmill, or using a stair-stepper. Even going for a walk is lower intensity. And yes, it’s good to move. I think it’s good. Yes, you’re burning calories, and yes, a body in motion stays in motion. It’s good to use your body, especially if you’re concerned about being low-impact and all those kinds of things. But there may be a better way to achieve body composition changes, whether it’s building muscle, burning fat, and then optimizing your time. So, that would be high‑intensity interval training, and I think you’re an expert on this. But I would certainly say that—I’ll just throw this out there—that changes really only happen in the body when you push the limits, and then adaptations come because you pushed the limits and the body says, “Okay, hold on, what’s happening here. Like this is really extreme. We need to adapt. We need to mobilize these fat stores. We need to create more muscle. We need to do things, make drastic changes here because this is some serious stuff that’s happening.” I mean, that’s the way I think of it.

Tim: I think that’s a great way to think about it, and I think there’s a few different layers to peel back here. Let’s maybe talk about the cardiovascular benefits, or the heart health benefits, of exercise. Martin Gibala and his team of researchers at McMaster University in Canada have done a lot of research on this because time is an extremely important barrier for people to age and exercise. What he and his team and many other researchers since then have examined—Abbie Smith-Ryan at North Carolina is another one who comes to mind who’s looked into the high-intensity exercise—they’re trying to overcome this “time” barrier, so what can we do in order to derive some of the same health benefits that we would from the low-intensity exercise. For instance, the American College of Sports Medicine has traditionally recommended 30 minutes of low- to moderate-intensity exercise every day, so 150 minutes or so a week, in order to maintain heart health. That’s a lot of time for a lot of people.

What Martin Gibala, Abbie Smith‑Ryan, and other researchers have been doing is looking at this high-intensity exercise. So, high-intensity interval training, like you talked about, is basically interspersing periods of very vigorous activity. So, if we were to subjectively rate our intensity, our level of effort on a scale of 1 to 10, typically exercising at like an 8 or 9, anywhere from 20 seconds to 2 minutes, and then taking a period where we’re less active. So maybe that’s walking, or even sometimes could be sitting down, but basically a recovery period. And that recovery period could be anywhere from 10 seconds to 2 minutes, again. Basically, it’s switching between vigorous exercise and less vigorous exercise, and you would repeat that. It depends on your fitness level, but it could be four times, it could be eight times, it could be ten times. That’s just kind of a general background on what that is. Well, what they find is that you can get the same cardiovascular benefits, the same metabolic benefits (in terms of insulin sensitivity and things like that) in a fraction of the time. We’re talking about 10 to 20 minutes of weekly exercise, instead of hours. So, there’s the health benefits there.

Shawn: Right, so what would it be like for someone who’s fairly sedentary? Maybe it’s walk to jog, where the majority of the time you’re walking, but you have periods of jogging where you’re taking it up a notch and you’re trying to do it as long as you can, where you’re really hitting that wall and then you go back to walking, and then go back to jogging. But if you’re maybe someone who’s fairly active, maybe it’s jog to sprint, where you’re sprinting all-out and just go until you’re gassed, and then you go again. It’s amazing. You could do low-intensity, steady-state, like we said, for hours. You could just go take a walk for hours. But try to do this high-intensity interval training, and you’ll be wiped out, potentially in 10 minutes.

Think about it. If you’re on a treadmill or you’re outside and you’re really going all-out to where you’re just panting heavy and you’re sweating and all that kind of stuff, you can only do that so long before you’re just totally wiped out. But again, that’s where changes are going to happen, in that very short period of time. And if you’re thinking that sounds too “intense for me,” here’s the thing that we’re saying: It’s a lot less time. So yes, it’s harder, but it’s way shorter. So save yourself the time and you’ll get more benefit, you’ll get more changes than you ever could just walking on a treadmill. Take a look into high-intensity interval training. Do some more research around it. Talk to your trainer about it. It’s definitely the way to go that I think is the best way.

Tim: I agree. Just one more thing with that, Shawn. Whenever we talk about exercise, I think it’s important that we don’t know where you’re at in your fitness journey, so if you have any questions about whether you should engage in an exercise program, make sure that you get clearance from your doctor.

Shawn: Absolutely. Good point.

Tim: And then one final thing on higher intensity exercise is that another potential advantage, from a weight management standpoint, is that because it does get your body outside of its comfort zone, you’re basically going to elevate metabolism for some time after exercise. So there’s this thing called “EPOC” or “Excess Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption.” You’re boosting your metabolism for hours. In some cases, depending on what type of exercise you’re doing, 24 to 48 hours after exercise. You get a little metabolism boost. I’m not saying that’s going to magically make weight loss happen, but for a lot of people, any boost is a good thing. So, it potentially has a fat-burning advantage, again, in a much shorter period of time.

Shawn: Well, that’s one myth down. So let’s get into some ones that I’m passionate about, as a dietitian, and I think many of my fellow dietitians out there might be misguided on and are maybe misleading some people on using old, old data that’s really just correlative from Ancel Keys, and it is these things like “sodium is bad for you,” “fat is bad for you,” “saturated fat is bad for you,” and “cholesterol is bad for you.” And to all those things, if you’re listening out there and you’re thinking, “Oh my gosh, yeah, all those things are terrible. I try to eat low-salt foods. I try to eat low-fat foods, and I definitely try to avoid saturated fat. Oh my gosh, that food has cholesterol,” I’ll say that all of those things are wrong.

I hate to burst your bubble, and if that really just crashes your whole world, we’ll explain. But all those things are really inaccurate, and it’s unfortunate. What did happen, I will say, with all those things is that Ancel Keys, who in the 1960s and 70s, made some correlations based on data from massive population studies. However, correlation is not causation. That’s an old saying, but it’s very true in this case where these things were associated with poorer health outcomes, especially like cardiovascular health. Why is that? I think one of the big things is that if you go back to those studies and you tease out processed foods, it makes a massive difference. And what we know is that when you’re looking at these processed foods is that there’s the “bliss point” that’s engineered into foods that involves crunchiness, sweetness, saltiness, and oiliness, which make you want to eat more and more, and more, and more. That’s a factor.

Now, maybe having fat with sugar has some issues. Certainly, fat is more calorically dense, but if I’m going to look for the “bad guys,” it would be these things. It would be processed foods. It would be sugar content. It would be overeating, maybe as a result of some of these engineered foods, these processed foods. And then the inflammatory fats, these vegetable fats that are just inflammatory, and those are not the saturated fats like coconut oil or butter. It’s not these things that we’ve been told are unhealthy. It is the margarine, ironically—the thing that we reach for instead of the butter—that was the thing that was actually inflammatory, that wasn’t as healthy.

And then the whole cholesterol thing just drives me insane because dietary cholesterol has almost no impact on your body’s cholesterol or endogenous cholesterol. Certainly eating higher fat can potentially raise some cholesterol, but on diets like the ketogenic diet or the Mediterranean diet, what will happen is that it raises HDL, which is protective. In some cases, it can raise LDL, but it’s a different type of LDL. It’s not the very low-density, it’s not the small dense fraction of LDL, which you don’t get when you normally test the way a doctor tests with HDL or LDL. You have to do something called an NMR test or a VAP test to look at all the different fractions. What it’s doing with LDL is raising the “large fluffy particles of LDL,” which is actually healthy. And what we see time and time again in these studies is if you look at cholesterol, the higher the cholesterol, the better the mortality. The lower the cholesterol, the worse the mortality. So, it’s definitely something to potentially talk to your doctor about. It’s maybe somewhat controversial at this point with cholesterol, but the tides are turning, the data is pretty clear. I think the medical community needs to catch up a little bit, and certainly other dietitians out there.

Tim: Agreed, Shawn. You mentioned sodium and you mentioned processed foods. And when you look at the typical American’s intake of sodium, about 75% of that is coming from processed foods. So people are like, “Well I shouldn’t add salt to my food.” Well, maybe you should check what you’re eating first. We’ve talked about eating more whole foods or having a whole foods-based diet. Once you start to do that, typically you need to add sodium or salt because when you eliminate that 75% (i.e., processed foods), you actually tend to be a little on the low side. And along those lines, people have consistently talked about sodium is bad or salt is bad or they need to go with a lower sodium diet. When you look at the data, a lower sodium diet is probably just as bad, if not worse, than extremely high sodium. Probably somewhere in the middle, if not a little bit higher than what we’ve been told, is probably a good guideline, actually. The low sodium, like I said, that some of the more recent research is showing that that’s probably worse.

Shawn: And particularly for athletes, sodium is like an incredible ergogenic aid, meaning it increases performance. And for everyone to be salt-phobic, and especially athletes, that’s kind of dangerous. I mean, it’s the number one thing that’s depleted from exercise. It’s coming out in your sweat and, yes, you could drink Gatorade or something like that, but getting that sodium back in your system really is going to drastically have an impact on your performance if you’re an athlete.

Tim: Agreed. I mean, sodium is an essential mineral. We need it for a number of functions, like body‑water balance, muscle contractions, and all those types of things. So, it’s really important to have the right amount of sodium, especially like you said, with active people. I know that I’ve worked with several coaching clients who said that they’re supposed to be eating a low sodium diet, and I tried to educate them to add some sodium, a lot of times in the form of like electrolyte tablets, like NUUN tablets. And they’re like, “Man, I feel great.”

Shawn: Yeah, it’s incredible.

Tim: I’m glad that we talked about that. Another one that you had mentioned was cholesterol, and specifically how dietary cholesterol has virtually no impact on blood cholesterol. And to me, one of the most fascinating examples of that is every five years or so, I think it’s the USDA, assembles a committee to come up with dietary guidelines, which are by and large very conservative. Very conservative in that most dietitians kind of use that as a resource. Well, the reason I cite that is because in 2015 they did this massive review and overhaul, and to me this is the most telling example of the fact that dietary cholesterol has no impact on, or virtually no impact on blood cholesterol, is that they said that. That this very conservative committee says that there’s no evidence to suggest that dietary cholesterol has an impact on blood cholesterol. In fact, that is leading to the removal of cholesterol guidelines on nutrition facts panel. I don’t know what it used to be, whatever milligrams per day, there’s no more ceiling for that. It’s not listed anymore because there is no upper limit. To me, that’s a really good example.

Shawn: Times are changing. I’m glad.

Tim: Another one that you had mentioned there was margarine, and I think that’s a really important point to bring up again because that’s been a foundational cornerstone since the 50s, like Ancel Keys’ research is to replace saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats, which is another type of fat. So you have saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and polyunsaturated fat. Basically those three categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are your types of fats that you find in butter, coconut oil, heavy cream, dairy, and things like that. Polyunsaturated fats are going to be, by and large, in your vegetable oils. And so, we’ve been told for a long time to replace those saturated fats with these polyunsaturated fats, and that’s where margarine came from. So, recently, within the last couple years, I think it was one of the British medicine journals, and there was a meta-analysis conducted. And what they found was that replacing polyunsaturated fats for saturated fats actually led to an increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease and all‑cause mortality, and I’ve seen additional meta-analyses since then. A meta-analysis basically is a collection of all these studies on a topic, so it’s a really intense scrutinization of the body of research. It really gives us a summary.

Shawn: So there was an increase in switching?

Tim: By taking in more margarine and less of those saturated fats actually increased the rate of heart disease and all-cause mortality. So, confirming what we’re saying.

Shawn: Yeah, that saturated fat is a better choice than the polyunsaturated. And canola is everywhere right now, and that’s actually an oil that comes from something called rapeseed, actually. And then it gets heated to extremely high heats to get these oils, and the oils are then oxidized, and then they have to add a bleaching process, and they have to add a deodorizing process to these rancid oxidized oils that are highly pro-inflammatory. So, that’s your choice. You’ve been told for years that canola is so healthy for you. Unfortunately, you go into Whole Foods and almost all the prepared foods are filled with canola oil, which is frustrating. But all these things, like these margarines and whatnot, are loaded with pro-inflammatory fats and not heart healthy, so it’s really led to so much confusion for people, like what’s what.

And then we brought up coconut oil, but that was recently brought up by the American Heart Association as being a saturated fat that’s dangerous, and certainly that has been contested not only by most of the mainstream media and just lay people out there, but many cardiovascular surgeons, many other nutritional medical bodies have raised into question that may be where some funding has come from the American Heart Association from certain groups, and why they might do this. But it does create confusion. And I will say, coconut oil is one of the healthiest things that you can use. It’s an excellent source of MCTs (medium-chain triglycerides), which are uniquely metabolized and can elevate blood ketone levels, but it is an anti-inflammatory fat. It’s great for your metabolism. There’s no concern, as far as I see, as using coconut oil in recipes or to cook with. I think it’s a great choice.

Tim: Yeah, I agree with that, Shawn. In fact, when that study came out, we worked on an article for the blog because there were headlines all over the place, “Coconut oil is not healthy and never was.” In that article, we took an interesting stand because we contested that, because like you said, we don’t believe that coconut oil is not healthy. It certainly can be healthy; however, we don’t necessarily think that it’s the only fat you should use.

Shawn: Of course.

Tim: So, I think that by and large people have a tendency to be on one end or the other, so we wanted to provide some middle ground. Because like you said, coconut oil is one of the few foods that has MCTs in it.

Shawn: Yeah, Medium-Chain Triglycerides.

Tim: Medium-Chain Triglycerides, which can boost metabolism, suppress appetite, and lift blood levels of ketones. However, coconut oil may not be quite as rich in MCTs as some other fats. It’s not a pure MCT. There’s other fats and other saturated fats that aren’t quite as short as the longer chain fatty acids. However, those longer chain fatty acids have other benefits, like antimicrobial.

Shawn: Lauric acid and B12.

Tim: Exactly. There’s tremendous health benefits with coconut oil in terms of body composition and overall health, but what we’re just suggesting is that it should be used as a part of an overall healthy diet. It’s not the be-all, end-all superfood, but it is definitely healthy. Again, myth-busted that coconut oils not good.

Shawn: Done. That one’s done. All right, we’re putting some myths to death.

Tim: Drop the microphone.

 

Enjoy the show? Please leave a 5-star review on iTunes or Stitcher.
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And remember…you’re just one decision away from better health and a better body

 

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  • Red Tolentino

    First episode is 🔥 It’s so easy to get info overload these days and this podcast is one of the few that peeps should follow.

    • Hey Red,

      Thanks so much for taking the time to listen and share your feedback. We appreciate the encouragement, and we’re glad to know that you enjoyed this first episode. We’re just getting started! 🙂

      Please feel free to share this episode with your family and friends, and if you haven’t already, make sure you subscribe (on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite app). We’ve got quite a few more episodes in the pipeline, and we’ll be releasing new shows each week.

      Thanks, Red!

      Make it a great day,

      Tim

  • Katharine Jensen

    Great show. Often wondered why. Thanks for clearing these myths up!

    • Thank YOU, Katharine! We appreciate you taking the time to listen to the show and to share your feedback. It means a lot to us. We’ll be busting more myths in the next episode. 🙂 Of course, our goal is to help guide you and answer YOUR questions, so if there’s anything you’d like for us to cover in a future episode of the podcast, please feel free to let us know. Thanks, Katharine!

      Make it a great day,

      Tim

  • Ann Tews

    I truly enjoyed the podcast. Some of the information I already knew, but some was new to me. I’m looking forward to hearing more good stuff from you guys as well as any others you have on the podcast. Thanks again for providing this avenue on health and nutrition!!

    • Hi Ann,

      We’re glad to hear that you enjoyed the podcast; thanks for taking the time to listen and let us know.

      Please feel free to share this episode with your family and friends, and if you haven’t already, make sure you subscribe (on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite app). We’ve got quite a few more episodes in the pipeline, and we’ll be releasing new shows each week.

      Of course, if you have any questions or topics you’d like for us to cover on future episodes, please feel free to let us know. We want to make these shows as relevant as possible to our listeners, and at the same time, we want to make sure that you walk away feeling empowered and inspired to take action.

      Thanks, Ann!

      Tim

  • Christy Rhodes-Fortune

    Yes

  • Elizabeth Phelps

    A solid start! I’m looking forward to the next episode. I really appreciate the transcript because I tend to tune out audio, and it’s easier to skim what I missed or read along than to jump back and forth along the audio.

    • Hi Elizabeth,

      Thanks a bunch for listening to the show! Please feel free to share this episode with your family and friends, and if you haven’t already, make sure you subscribe (on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite app). We’ve got quite a few more episodes in the pipeline, and we’ll be releasing new shows each week.

      Thanks for letting us know that you appreciate the transcript. We’ll keep those coming as part of the show notes. Let us know if there’s anything else you think we can do to improve the podcast, and if there’s anything that you’d like for us to cover in future episodes of BioTrust Radio, please feel free to let us know.

      Thanks, Elizabeth!

      Tim

  • Georganne

    How can you be on Keto diet without increasing your cholesterol? It drove up both my husband’s and mine, ldl as well as total.

    • Hi Georganne,

      That’s a great question! And actually, Shawn touched on this in this episode of the podcast. Here’s what he had to say on the topic:

      “And then the whole cholesterol thing just drives me insane because dietary cholesterol has almost no impact on your body’s cholesterol or endogenous cholesterol. Certainly eating higher fat can potentially raise some cholesterol, but on diets like the ketogenic diet or the Mediterranean diet, what will happen is that it raises HDL, which is protective. In some cases, it can raise LDL, but it’s a different type of LDL. It’s not the very low-density, it’s not the small dense fraction of LDL, which you don’t get when you normally test the way a doctor tests with HDL or LDL. You have to do something called an NMR test or a VAP test to look at all the different fractions. What it’s doing with LDL is raising the “large fluffy particles of LDL,” which is actually healthy. And what we see time and time again in these studies is if you look at cholesterol, the higher the cholesterol, the better the mortality. The lower the cholesterol, the worse the mortality. So, it’s definitely something to potentially talk to your doctor about. It’s maybe somewhat controversial at this point with cholesterol, but the tides are turning, the data is pretty clear. I think the medical community needs to catch up a little bit, and certainly other dietitians out there.”

      In other words, yes, if you’re eating a high-fat diet, there’s a good chance that you’ll experience an increase in cholesterol. However, without getting overly complex, the increase in cholesterol is a result of: 1. higher levels of HDL (or the “good”) cholesterol, which is typically associated with better heart health; and 2. an increase the size and volume of LDL cholesterol particles, which is considered to reduce cardiovascular disease risk.

      In other words, although LDL cholesterol is viewed collectively as “bad”, the size and density of the LDL particles seems to matter significantly. Large, fluffy particles (which we tend to see an increase in with high-fat ketogenic diets) reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, small, dense LDL particles have a higher atherogenicity (or artery-clogging properties). Unfortunately, typical cholesterol tests only measure total LDL…not particle size and density. So, an increase in LDL is viewed as “bad”; however, that doesn’t tell the whole story.

      For what it’s worth, high-fat ketogenic diets seem to be particularly effective at lowering levels of blood triglycerides and insulin, which are certainly very important variables/metrics to consider when thinking about heart and overall health.

      I hope this helps, Georganne. Have a great day!

      Tim

  • Denise Klug

    I thought this show was excellent! Lots of myth busters debunked! A must listen for all!

    • Thanks for the great feedback, Denise!

      Please feel free to share this episode with your family and friends, and if you haven’t already, make sure you subscribe (on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite app). We’ve got quite a few more episodes in the pipeline, and we’ll be releasing new shows each week.

      And if there are any topics or questions you’d like for us to cover on future episodes of the show, please don’t hesitate to let us know. This podcast and all our resources are dedicated to helping our listeners and customers. We appreciate the opportunity to join you on your journey!

  • April Garcia de Gallegos

    Thank you, very informative. I didn’t realize that dietary cholesterol is not a huge factor on your body’s cholesterol. I just started using coconut oil and love it.

    • Hi April,

      Glad that you enjoyed the show! Please feel free to share it with family and friends, and if you haven’t already, please subscribe so that you don’t miss an episode. There’s plenty more to come, and we’ll be releasing a new episode each week.

      As far as coconut oil, you may want to check out this article where we take a bit of a deeper dive. I don’t think there’s any danger to using it as part of an overall healthy diet; however, I don’t necessarily think it deserves a halo, and it’s probably best to use a combination of healthy fats (instead of just relying on a single source).

      Thanks, April; have a great day!

  • Jill Holmes Brown

    Hi, I love your shakes! But my question is, are eggs good or bad for you? I’ve read so many different articles with differing opinions. I’d like to know what you think. Thanks, Jill

    • Ah, GREAT question, Jill! In fact, Shawn and I will cover this in the next episode of the podcast, so make sure that you subscribe so you don’t miss it. 🙂 In the meantime, you might consider taking a look at our following article on the topic:

      6 Reasons You Should Eat the WHOLE Egg

      Thanks, Jill! And please feel free to share any other questions or topics you’d like for us to cover in the future. This podcast is fueled by our listeners, and we want to make sure that we’re providing you with the tools, tactics, and strategies you can put to use right away to optimize your health and fitness.

      Make it a great day,

      Tim

  • Andre Huynh

    Interesting as eye opening, good to learn that high-intensity interval training is the better exercise way to focus on. Also a useful update on sodium intake/dietary cholesterol/processed food, very well done. Would definitely love to hear you guys dive deeper with different kind of available salts out there (table salt, iodine salt, sea salt, Himalayan pink salt,…) & hopefully there will be many informative talks about ketogenic/bullet-proof diets, hydrogen/ionized/kangen/electrolyte-enhanced water… Keep up with. Thanks much!

    • Hey Andre,

      Thanks so much for listening to the show and for sharing your feedback. We’re glad you enjoyed it!

      And thank you also for sharing the ideas for future podcast episodes. We want the show to provide relevant and actionable information for our listeners, so your feedback is instrumental to us.

      As far as salt, we can definitely dive into that in the future. For now, you might be interested to check out this article where we covered the topic.

      And absolutely, we’ll be covering the ketogenic diet in an upcoming 2-part episode of the podcast; so, make sure to subscribe (if you haven’t already), and stay tuned! We also have several keto articles here on the blog that you might be interested to check out, including this beginner’s guide and this follow-up piece.

      Thanks, Andre; keep up the great work!

  • Mark Loendorf Sr

    what would the best powder be when you workout at 3am and get to bed at 10am

    • Hi Mark,

      I hope this finds you doing well. Thank you very much for stopping by and sharing your question. We’ll be happy to help.

      It sounds like you may be a shift worker; is that correct? Shift work can be quite the bugger, and while it’s a pretty complex topic (and unique on an individual level), it can take quite a toll on circadian rhythms and health. I’d be curious to hear more about your situation.

      As far as a protein supplement, you may want to check out BioTrust Low Carb. We even have free samples if you’d like to give it a test-drive before you commit to a full-sized container.

      There are many benefits to BioTrust Low Carb (it’s made with natural ingredients…it contains no GMOs, soy, or artificial sweeteners, flavors, colors, or preservatives…it provides 24 grams of protein per serving…it contains prebiotic fibers for gut health, appetite control, and blood sugar management…it contains hormone- and antibiotic-free proteins…and more), and from a utility standpoint, it’s nice that it can be used before/after your workout, as a meal replacement/part of a meal, as a snack, etc. In other words, it’s very versatile, and on top of that, it tastes awesome.

      Let us know if you have any other questions, Mark. We’re here to help.

      Thanks!

      Tim

  • Terri Chorma N

    Great listen! Look forward to more! Shared with a couple of friends!

    • Hi Terri,

      Thanks so much for the feedback; we’re glad that you enjoyed the show, and we really appreciate you sharing with your friends. If you haven’t already, please make sure that you subscribe to the show. We’ll be releasing new episodes each week, and we’d hate for you to miss a show. 🙂 Along those lines, if there’s anything you’d like to hear us cover in the future, please let us know. This podcast is designed to be for our listeners.

      Thanks, Terri; have a great day!

      Tim

  • Andre Huynh

    Interesting as eye opening, good to learn that high-intensity interval training is the better exercise way to focus on. Also a useful update on sodium intake/dietary cholesterol/processed food, very well done. Would definitely love to hear you guys dive deeper with different kind of available salts out there (table salt, iodine salt, sea salt, Himalayan pink salt,…) & hopefully there will be many informative talks about ketogenic/bullet-proof diets, hydrogen/ionized/kangen/electrolyte-enhanced water… Keep up with. Thanks much!

  • Steve Tsokos

    Looking forward to future podcasts … excellent content in this discussion and good range of fitness/nutrition topics! Cheers!

    • Thanks, Steve! Please let us know if there are any topics or questions that you’d like to hear us cover on future episodes. And of course, stay tuned, as we’ll be releasing new episodes each week.

      Have a great day!

  • Ann Darling

    This was an amazing podcast. I learned so much! I am unemployed after 32 years and am struggling with the $ that these things are costing me. I did order BioTrust this n my credit card to get started. But money is not available to me. I can’t wait to receive it and get started until it runs out. I could use the free help! Thanks!i

    • Thank YOU, Ann! We’re really glad you tuned in and enjoyed the show. We appreciate our loyal customers and listeners, and if there’s anything that you’d like to hear us cover on future episodes of the show, please don’t hesitate to let us know.

      Thanks, Ann; have a great day!

      Tim

  • Harry Deloach

    Great stuff,

    • Cristina

      Hi Harry, we are thankful for your time and your willingness to write a review to let us know how we are doing.

      Come visit us again soon. You can count on everyone of us doing our best!

  • Hey Lou,

    Thanks so much for stopping by. First off, that’s awesome that you’ve committed your life to improving the quality of life of others; we really admire your dedication and line of work. Keep being awesome!

    As far as samples, we do offer samples of our BioTrust Low Carb natural protein powder. For more information on our products, you can visit the Products page on our website, or you can download our Product Catalog.

    For general information pertaining to health, fitness, nutrition, and supplements, you’ve come to the right place as well. We cover all these topics (and more) here on our blog (which we update almost every single day), our podcast (we release new episodes each week), and on our Facebook page and private VIP Facebook group.

    We hope that you find these resources helpful, Lou; keep up the great work!

    Tim

  • Hi Kristeen,

    Thanks so much for listening and for sharing your encouraging feedback. We’re glad you enjoyed the show, and we’re excited to hear that it helped set the record straight for you. That’s why we’re here. 🙂

    BioTrust Radio is fueled by our listeners, and it’s geared to cover your questions and relevant health and fitness topics. So, if there’s anything you’d like to hear us cover in the future, please be sure to let us know.

    Thanks, Kristeen; keep up the great work!

  • Hi Anne,

    Thanks for tuning into the show; we’re really glad to hear that you enjoyed it. That’s awesome that you were able to walk away some action items that you can implement right away. If you’re interested in learning more about coconut oil, you might want to check out this article.

    Keep us posted with your progress, and if there’s anything that we can do to help, please don’t hesitate to let us know.

    Thanks, Anne; have a great day!

  • Anne

    If I’m taking a statin, can I STOP taking it, or do I have to be weaned off it?

    • Hi Anne,

      That’s a great question, and it’s definitely one that you’ll need to talk to your doctor about. In other words, you should never stop taking any medication (or adjust the dosage) without first consulting your physician.

      My best,

      Tim

  • Hi Mary,

    Thank you so much for the wonderful feedback; it’s music to our ears! We really consider it a privilege to join people like you on your journey, and we are very grateful for the opportunity to guide you. So, to know that we’re making a difference really means an awful lot to us; thank you for letting us know.

    Please stay tuned, as we’ll be releasing a new episode of BioTrust Radio each week, and if there are any questions or topics you’d like for us to cover in the future, please don’t hesitate to let us know.

    Thanks, Mary; have a great day!

  • Rick Arneson

    what would be some good ways to use coconut oil

  • Judy Percer

    Great info. My husband (very old school) was listening and asked to hear to the cardio part twice. Big surprise for me. Keep up the great info. Nice to have it all in one place.

    • Hi Judy,

      So, your husband had to do the ol’ double-take, eh? 🙂 He might also be interested to take a look at the following article on the subject:

      What’s the Best Cardio for Weight Loss? Slow Go or HIIT?

      It’s not to say that old-school, steady-state cardio is bad per se. Rather, it’s simply to say that HIIT may be a more time-efficient strategy, and considering that lack of time is typically the most frequently cited reason for not exercising, it seems like a pretty viable strategy. Plus, I think few people actually include proper progressions when they do the ol’ slow-go cardio.

      We’re really glad that you (and your husband) enjoyed the show, Judy. Stay tuned, and please let us know if there’s anything that you guys would like for us to cover on future episodes.

      Keep up the great work!

  • Hi James,

    It’s our pleasure to help, and we appreciate you being open-minded to the evolving science and subsequent recommendations that come from new findings. Let us know if there’s anything that we can do to help you in your journey.

    Keep up the good work!

    Tim

  • That’s fantastic to hear, Essot! And if there’s anything that we can do to help you, please don’t hesitate to let us know.

    My best,

    Tim

  • Ann Roseberry

    Are you guys doing any research or coming out with products that boost glutathione? Great info.

    • Hi Ann,

      Fantastic question! Thanks so much for sharing. We’ve covered glutathione (which, for those of you following at home, is often referred to as the body’s master antioxidant) in several blog articles, including mitochondrial health, anti-aging, immune health and function, and more.

      Along these lines, our Ageless Body supplement contains Setria® Glutathione, which is the only oral form of glutathione that has been shown to boost the body’s stores of glutathione. Glutathione has been shown to fight free radicals, protect cells and mitochondria oxidative stress, boost the immune system, promote detoxification, improve skin brightness, reduce fine lines and wrinkles, and more.

      It’s certainly an exciting ingredient, and what’s even more compelling is that Ageless Body also contains CurcuWIN (the most bioavailable, longest lasting Turmeric extract), Ashwaghanda, CoQ10, and Vitamin C. There’s a lot to be said about the health and anti-aging properties of each of these ingredients.

      Please let us know if you have any questions, Ann; thank you!

  • ellen lachs

    excellent info .i also love the emails with your expertise on different subjects

    • Hi Ellen,

      Thanks so much for your feedback and encouragement. It really means a lot to us to know that we’re making a difference. In addition to the podcast and our emails, I think you’ll also find the BioTrust Blog to be a great resource. We update it with brand-new content almost daily. Of course, if there’s anything you’d like to hear or see us cover in the future, please don’t hesitate to let us know. We’re here for you!

      Have a great day,

      Tim

  • Hi Susan,

    I hope this finds you doing well! Thanks so much for your feedback; we’re glad that you enjoyed the show.

    Certainly, we’ve been groomed to believe that all sodium is bad, which simply isn’t true. Could many people stand to reduce their sodium intake? I suppose. However, I think this would be a by-product of improving overall diet quality. That is, over 75% of the average person’s sodium intake comes from restaurant and processed foods. On the other hand, only about 12% of sodium comes from whole foods, and only 4% is added during cooking, at the table, etc. (in the form of salt).

    With that in mind, you can see that as you gravitate toward healthier eating habits (i.e., eating less processed/prepared foods and eating more whole minimally processed foods), there’s an increased likelihood that you’d need to add sodium to your diet. In fact, as we mentioned on the show, many active, healthy people will need to salt their foods and consider using electrolyte tablets (such as NUUN) to make sure they’re getting enough sodium, which serves numerous critical functions in the body (related to the nervous system, muscular contractions, and body water balance).

    Thanks again for your support, Susan; keep up the great work!

  • Jeri Hromadnik Hannon

    Great information as always. Thanks for keeping us so well informed and for creating such great products.

    • Cristina

      What a wonderful Surprise! Your words of encouragement, Jeri, make us feel proud of what we do.

      Know that are thankful for the trust you have placed on us, and that we are working extra hard to always push ourselves to the next level.

      Thank you for your friendship and patronage.

  • Jamie Kaiser Gagnon

    This is great information! I really appreciated hearing about sodium, especially when we are eating whole foods that we may be in need of sodium. I also love that you included a transcript of the podcast. I’m not always in a place that I can listen to podcasts, but I am more able to read. I also like to be able to go back and look for the information i may have missed, like the information on canola oil. I was able to listen this morning though!

    • Cristina

      Thank you, Jamie, for giving us such high marks. We are constantly hard at work to deliver the best possible products and experiences. Your review is valuable to us as we shape our customer strategy and useful to other community members trying to decide if we are a good fit for their needs.

      We can’t wait for the next opportunity to serve you; and will do everything in our power to once again allow you to experience the best that we have to offer.

      Warmest regards,
      Coach C

  • Paul Moniz

    Thanks for the great info the first Podcast was awesome can’t wait to hear more

    • Cristina

      Hi Paul.

      Thank you so much for this great feedback. We realize our customers are busy, and knowing you took the time to voice your opinion and give us such high accolades validates every effort we make to go the extra mile.

      We look forward to your next visit and will once again work hard to earn your endorsement.

  • Cristina

    We are extremely grateful for your review, Marlies. We will do everything in our power to make certain every single visit is equally delightful.

    Looking forward to your next visit.

  • Alex Nikkol

    On to a new, healthier me!

    • Cristina

      Hi Alex. We are so excited to hear that the information we have provided is helpful in your journey to discovering the healthiest version of yourself.

      We welcome your feedback, and topic suggestions. If there is anything you would like to see us cover in a future podcast or in a blog article, please let us know.

      Our goal is to make you a part of our family and make you feel welcome every single time.

  • Thank you, everyone, for tuning into the BioTrust Radio podcast and for sharing your feedback, questions, and encouragement. We appreciate you! Congratulations to these three lucky BioTrust Radio listeners, who just scored themselves $200 IN FREE BIOTRUST SUPPLEMENTS (by leaving their comments/questions below after listening to the show):

    -Ann Darling
    -Jamie Gagnon
    -Ann Tews

    Are YOU interested in getting better health and fitness results faster AND winning FREE supplements? I thought so. 🙂

    Simply tune into our BioTrust Radio podcast each week (starting with Episode 2) as my fellow co-host Shawn and I take a deep dive into all things related to nutrition, exercise, and supplements, including your questions, hot topics, and myths.

    After you listen to the show, be sure to leave us a comment or question to enter for your chance to win FREE BioTrust products. Information is power, and remember, you’re just ONE DECISION away from better health and a better body!

  • Donna Lynn

    This was very upbeat and motivational. As an older person,72, I would like baby steps to good health aging. Please give us a list of little things to begin our new journey. It is overwhelming to go from sedentary to active. Thank you Tim and Shawn.

  • Della Cullins

    Your newsletter is very informative and motivational to stay with healthy eating habits. Knowledge is power. Thank you.